A New Release: 50 More Excel Functions

I decided to start the new year off right with a new release.

When I originally wrote 50 Useful Excel Functions I chose those functions from a list of about 125 total functions I thought could be really useful to someone. I didn’t want to write them all up in one book because that’s just too much to handle for the average user in my opinion.

But it wasn’t easy to narrow that list down either, because which functions a user considers most useful will very much depend on why they’re using Excel. I also had to include in that book certain functions just for completeness sake. If I was going to discuss X function then I also really needed to discuss Y and Z functions, too.

Which meant that I was left with about a hundred functions that I didn’t cover in the first book but that I figured a certain number of users might want to know about.

Well, now I’ve covered another batch of them in 50 More Excel Functions.

This one really digs into some of the date and time functions and discusses the quirks of how Excel handles dates, at least one of which threw me a nasty surprise on a work project a few years ago. Hint: Don’t work with really old dates in Excel, it doesn’t turn out well.

Anyway. Happy new year. Enjoy.

50 More Excel Functions open sans

 

New Release: 50 Useful Excel Functions

And it’s done. My first book of 2018 has been published. 50 Useful Excel Functions is just what it sounds like, a guide to the fifty Excel functions I find most useful.

It was a weird experience writing this one because at first I was going to do fifty functions and then I decided maybe I’d just do 25 and have four other guides for specific types of functions like Date & Time. Then I started writing it and realized 25 functions didn’t feel like enough content. But by the time I finished it 50 seemed like I was stretching for the last couple even though I’d started with a list of about 125 I thought were useful to some extent.

Anyway. It’s done now and I’m pleased with it and think people who want to learn about Excel functions will find use in it .

It does bring up an interesting point for self-publishers/writers.

Because one of the challenges with writing non-fiction is what to do when a title sells well. If you’ve said what you thought you needed to say what else is there to do with it? Write a new version hoping people will buy it again? Eh. Write another title that basically says the same thing over again? Ugh. (Not for me.)

Fortunately, when I was working on the video courses for Excel for Beginners and Intermediate Excel I realized that there were a few ways I could deliver more value and extend on what I’d covered in those two books. 50 Excel Functions is the first of those, but I have a few more ideas in the pipeline. So if nothing else the video courses were good for that.

Oh, and speaking of Excel for Beginners…It had a nice little #1 Bestseller tag on Amazon today. Might not be the first time but it’s the first time I’ve noticed it, so that was cool:

Excel 4 Beg #1 Bestseller Tag