Excel, Word, and PowerPoint Essentials

Excel Essentials 20190222  Word-Essentials-Kindle  PowerPoint-Essentials-Kindle

I published Excel Essentials, the collection of the four individual titles in the Excel Essentials series a while back. At the time I didn’t publish the ebook version on Amazon, but that is now available on Amazon for anyone interested.

And because I am also done with the Word Essentials series and the PowerPoint Essentials series at this point, those too are now available as standalone titles. Note that Word Essentials and PowerPoint Essentials only contain two titles each so are that much less expensive than Excel Essentials which contains four titles.

Also, for at least the next week or so Word Essentials and PowerPoint Essentials will not be available on Apple but they will be there soon. (I’m changing how I distribute my books there and it takes a little longer than I’d expected.)

The books are all available in ebook, paperback, and hard cover but it may take a few days for them to reach all the stores.

For those of you who already own the individual titles (Word for Beginners, Intermediate Word, PowerPoint for Beginners, Intermediate PowerPoint, etc.) there is no new material in these books, it’s just another way to provide the information for those who know they want it all at the time of initial purchase.

As of now I’m done with writing new material on Microsoft Office, but if there’s something specific you want to see that I didn’t cover, let me know and if I think it’s within my skillset I’ll work on it. That’s actually how Excel for Budgeting and Mail Merge for Beginners both came to exist.

 

Excel, Word, and PPT Books Now in Hard Cover

Just a quick announcement to let you know that Excel for Beginners, Intermediate Excel, 50 Useful Excel Functions, 50 More Excel Functions, Excel Essentials, Word for Beginners, Intermediate Word, and PowerPoint for Beginners are all now available in a hard cover version.

IMG_4875 - Copy cropped

I have to say, I’m pretty excited about this one because the books feel much more substantial in hard cover than paperback. (That Excel Essentials one which combines the other four Excel titles into one book is a behemoth. It’s one inch thick and weighs two pounds! Who knew I had so much to say about Excel.)

The covers are case laminate so there might be a little denting at the edges like you can see on 50 More Excel Functions in the photo, but overall I was pretty impressed with them. And keep in mind with the skinnier ones that the spine text might be slightly off center because of print-on-demand variances, but it will be there on all of them.

They should be available on Amazon (here’s my author page for the U.S.) as well as Barnes & Noble and any other location where you can order print books.

Data Principles for Beginners

I forgot to announce that I released a new title a few days ago called Data Principles for Beginners. If you’ve read the Excel titles you’ll note that I make mention throughout those books about issues I’ve run into on data projects I worked on with respect to structuring data or analyzing it.

Well, this book takes all of those little mentions and puts them in one place as well as exploring a few other key principles that will make life a lot easier for anyone trying to work with their data.

Data Principles for Beginners

 

A New Release (or Six): Mail Merge

It’s been a busy week. I know better than to do this to myself, but I just released six new titles. The big one is Mail Merge for Beginners, which covers how to create customized letters, envelopes, and mailing labels in Microsoft Word using an Excel-based list of entries.

Mail Merge

And, because it’s a pretty short and sweet guide, it’s only $2.99. So if that’s something you need (I certainly used mail merge back when I was working as a secretary at my dad’s little sign shop), then check it out.

It will also be available in paperback for $7.99. The paperback is up on Amazon now, but not yet linked to the ebook–that should happen in a couple days–but it will come up in search. It will slowly make its way to anywhere else you like to buy paperbacks in the next couple of weeks.

In addition to the mail merge book, I also just released five titles in a series called Easy Word Essentials. These books take specific topics from Word for Beginners and Intermediate Word and present them as standalone topics. They cover text formatting, page formatting, lists, tables, and track changes.

So if any of those topics are of interest and you haven’t already bought the two main Word titles, then those might be worth checking out as well. Each one is $2.99 and the paperbacks are $7.99. Same situation as above, the paperbacks aren’t yet linked on Amazon but can be found with a search and will be soon. They will also make their way to other platforms over the next couple weeks.

Easy Word Essentials

Text Formatting open sansPage Formatting1 Lists2 TablesTrack Changes

 

 

 

And now I can go enjoy my Easter and get back to proofing the next cozy mystery. Those murders don’t solve themselves, you know. 🙂 Happy holiday and/or family time to you all.

A Quick Excel Copy & Paste Trick

It’s been a while since I shared an Excel trick on here and this is one that didn’t make it into the books although I do find it useful.

As a refresher: If you want to copy an entry and paste it into other cells, an easy way to do so is to click on the cell with the information you want to copy, use Ctrl + C, then highlight the cells where you want to paste that information and use Ctrl + V or Enter.

Another option if the cells where you want to copy the information are located next to the cell with the information you want to copy is to highlight the cells you want to copy, left-click on the bottom right corner and drag down or drag to the right.

(If there’s already data in other columns and you want to copy downward you can just double left-click instead of click and drag.)

I tend to use the click and drag option a lot, but it fails me sometimes, especially when I want to copy date information because it gets too clever.

For example, in a lot of my sales tracking spreadsheets I add a column for month and a column for year and then need to copy that down however many sales entries there are for that vendor for that month.

When you click and drag with month and year information, Excel treats the data as a series by default and does the following:

Excel Copy Paste Default

I wanted every entry to be April 2019, but Excel in its wisdom advanced the month and the year by one for each row.

It turns out you can fix that by clicking on the Auto Fill Options image at the bottom right corner and changing it from “Fill Series” to “Copy Cells.”

Auto Fill Options

You then get what I actually wanted:

Excel Copy Paste 2

Another way to copy the exact same value to multiple cells in Excel is using Ctrl+Shift+Enter. Highlight all of the cells that you want to have a specific value, then enter that value in the first cell of the highlighted range, like so:

All Cells Highlighted

Then instead of using Enter, use Shift+Ctrl+Enter. The value you input into the first cell will be copied to all of the highlighted cells.

It only works for one value at a time, though. So in my scenario above I’d have to do the month first and then have to do the year separately.

Both of these tricks work in Excel 2013, which is what I’m working in, so I’d assume they work in all versions of Excel beyond 2013 as well. They may or may not work in prior versions of Excel.

Edited to add that now through June 29, 2019 you can get a 15% discount on any of the ebook versions of the Excel Essentials titles on Barnes & Noble by using promo code BNPEE15.

 

Excel Essentials Now Live

For those who are ready to dive into Excel and move from a beginner level to an advanced intermediate level all at once, Excel Essentials is now live.

This title combines Excel for Beginners, Intermediate Excel, 50 Useful Excel Functions, and 50 More Excel Functions. So with this one book you can basically move from not knowing anything about Excel at all to understanding how to input information, format that information, print that information, use conditional formatting, charts, and pivot tables, as well as learn over one hundred Excel functions.

If that’s not what you need, each of the individual titles are also still available and the even more specific Easy Excel Essentials series of titles are available, too.

Excel Essentials is available for $39.95 in paperback or $19.95 in ebook. (Those are the USD prices) For those who want a Kindle-compatible version, you can find it on my Payhip store. The ebook will not be listed on Amazon.

Excel Essentials 20190222.jpg

A New Release: 50 More Excel Functions

I decided to start the new year off right with a new release.

When I originally wrote 50 Useful Excel Functions I chose those functions from a list of about 125 total functions I thought could be really useful to someone. I didn’t want to write them all up in one book because that’s just too much to handle for the average user in my opinion.

But it wasn’t easy to narrow that list down either, because which functions a user considers most useful will very much depend on why they’re using Excel. I also had to include in that book certain functions just for completeness sake. If I was going to discuss X function then I also really needed to discuss Y and Z functions, too.

Which meant that I was left with about a hundred functions that I didn’t cover in the first book but that I figured a certain number of users might want to know about.

Well, now I’ve covered another batch of them in 50 More Excel Functions.

This one really digs into some of the date and time functions and discusses the quirks of how Excel handles dates, at least one of which threw me a nasty surprise on a work project a few years ago. Hint: Don’t work with really old dates in Excel, it doesn’t turn out well.

Anyway. Happy new year. Enjoy.

50 More Excel Functions open sans