Three Years, Four Bookbubs, Finally Profitable

I’ve been fortunate with most of the things I’ve published that they were quickly profitable. But my YA fantasy series has been my constant heartbreak. I sprung for nice covers and paid to launch the first book and then did a free promo on that one when book 3 came out and all the other things you’re supposed to do, but it’s always returned less than all of that cost.

And it wasn’t because the books were bad. In general, the reviews have been good. I’ve received emails from fans about how much they loved it, it got an almost perfect score in the Writer’s Digest contest I entered it in, was a semi-finalist in the SPFBO, and even has a decent review average on Goodreads.

It’s also the only series I have that can get Bookbubs.

With all of that you’d think it would be my most profitable series, right? But no, not at all.

The first book in that series is one of my top five in terms of money grossed and the other two titles in that series are in my top ten, but when you put it all together with the cost of the covers and the cost of advertising, that series has been my worst performing series. The amount I spent on covers and ads has always been more than I earned.

(And that’s only the case with one other “series” of mine. My cookbook which has far too clever a title for its own good.)

Now, the bulk of the expense for the YA fantasy series was the covers. I spent about $2K on those covers, all told. So I had to not only make more from my advertising than I was spending but I had to make enough to cover that $2K in cover costs. Not an easy thing to do.

But I finally did it! It “only” took three years from the publication of book 1 and four Bookbubs (either YA or international-only fantasy so I’ve never gotten the big holy grail U.S. fantasy deal) to make it happen.

It’s not the cover’s fault. I launched book 1 at full price and wide. And I’ve left the books at a higher price point when they’re not in a promotion. (Although that strategy has worked just fine for me with other titles. It just wasn’t a good choice for a YA fantasy series.) I figure when I launch the next series under that name I can always drop the prices on the first series or even permafree book 1 at that point so that there’s somewhere to make that up.

I share this because it’s a good reminder of something I think it’s easy to lose sight of with self-publishing. I expect that this series could sell to new readers for the next twenty years. So if it doesn’t go into the red again due to bad advertising choices, I have twenty years of sales to make a profit on this series. And if I go back to that name and add to those books with another series that’s very likely to boost this first series.

So hope is never lost.

(Although it is hard to keep going when you think you did everything right and it doesn’t work out the way you hoped. That’s probably part of the reason I’ve found it challenging to write another series under that name.)

Anyway. For today I’ll treasure this small victory and remind myself that there’s always hope.

Author: M.L. Humphrey

I am a former securities regulator, registered stockbroker (although only briefly), and consultant on regulatory and risk-related matters for large financial institutions with expertise in the areas of anti-money laundering regulation, mutual funds, and credit rating agencies. Since 2013 I have also been a published author who writes under a variety of pen names across non-fiction, fantasy, and romance.

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